New Recruits: Jim Green Pottery

New Recruits: Jim Green Pottery
New Recruits: Jim Green Pottery
New Recruits: Jim Green Pottery

New Recruits: Jim Green Pottery

Jim Green is a South London based potter who works primarily in ceramics. Relatively new to the scene, he has been specialising in creating simple yet functional pieces for the past four years, all of which is thrown, turned and glazed by hand. Preferring to focus on creating one-off items or small batches, every item is unique and provides an element of exclusivity. Buying into JG Pottery feels like buying into a piece of art. It is something to be cherished, but used. Inspiration comes from a variety of sources including 60’s, 70’s Scandinavian and German ceramics.

What inspired you to start working in ceramics? I'd always had an interest in objects that were appealing in their shape or design and that extended to pottery as it can have a function and also look nice sat on a shelf or simply held. I was lucky to have been taught pottery as a child at school in the 1970s and have fond memories of the things I made. I think in the back of my mind I'd always fancied giving it a go as an adult so I took up evening classes at Morley College about four years ago with a specific interest in throwing. After a few years there I joined the Kiln Rooms in Peckham and things have evolved from there. What was your first job? My first job out of college was working in a model making supplies shop called Alec Tiranti in central London on Warren Street. It's a company that's well known amongst sculptors, model makers and other artists. Funnily enough I wasn't massively interested in clay at that point but used to mess around with the rubber moulding equipment and resins they sold. I actually trained as a graphic designer with a bit of interest in 3D so I was still messing around in that area outside of work hours. My full-time work now is as a children's book designer. The ceramics at the moment is a part time concern but I'm hoping in time that will change. What are your main influences? I’ve always loved 20th century design and I guess in particular post war modernist stuff whether that be architecture, product design, furniture, textiles, art and of course ceramics so I draw influences from all of those things. I remember going to a Robin and Lucienne Day retrospective at the Barbican about 15 or so years ago, that galvanised a few ideas and interests for me. Also, being a kid growing up in the 1970s there was plenty of shapes and colours in my day to day that have stuck with me. It probably explains why I like brown so much! Having recently moved away from London, have your new surroundings had an impact on your creativity and designs? The time I'm spending in Glasgow has definitely influenced me. I love cycle touring and hiking so we've been making the most of easy access to places like the Outer Hebrides and the Cairngorms. Unconsciously or not those places are somehow working their way back into my work if only in subtle ways. I really love concrete water towers and being a cyclist I see them a fair few times, the shapes of them have definitely ended up in my pots. I'm moving back to London in August so I'm curious to see if my work changes again. You say you like to make mostly functional pieces which people can use often – what are your most popular? Mugs! Definitely mugs.  It's the most functional item ever and you use it every day, possibly multiple times. I enjoy making mugs and I sometimes use them to try out new glazing or design tests on them because even if the glazing doesn't work out you still have an interesting usable item once it's finished. What has been your most memorable moment in your career so far? Hard to say really. I've had lots of nice opportunities and they're all memorable in their own way. I love Scandinavian and Japanese ceramics so having my work purchased by shops and individuals from those countries is a nice feeling. Throwing my first decent bottle shape was also a memorable one. Took a while to crack it. Where would you like to see yourself in ten years? Hard to say as I don't look that far ahead to be honest. I’d like to still be content, healthy and riding my bike around places. Still making pots and enjoying it, maybe doing that more than the day job...Can't ask for much more. Why Couverture? You have a nice eye for objects and your store is well curated. Happy to be part of the equation.